Tag Archives: Lee Anne Johnston

Thoughts on Point of View

Our most recent around-the-table discussion…

photo by Marcie Schwindt

photo by Marcie Schwindt

Elizabeth McCallister
I think point of view is one of the most difficult things that new writers can face. It seems like a simple enough task – are you writing in the first, second or third person.

It gets more complicated when you actually get down to doing it well. In a sense, you must inhabit not only the personalities of your characters but also the world that you have created. A narrator who describes someone or something seems the easiest route until you realize that you have written something from one of the characters’ POV.

Trying to write from more than one character’s POV can be one of the most difficult tasks. How do you clearly separate the two characters’ POV so that each rings clearly?

Which is the final most difficult task – creating a character who seems fully human.

Jockie Loomer-Kruger
I like first person especially ideal for memoir which is my preferred genre. I [also] like it for the poetry I write.

Second person – sounds like a lecture. Thou shalt not…

Third person – can add a different type of detail from first. Good for fiction with various characters.

Omniscient – All knowing and able to get into everyone’s thoughts – best for descriptive scenes, for commentary on a character.

Barbara Lefcourt
From 1st person, there are unlimited POV – age, sex, ethnicity, personality, stage of life. What first person POV do you feel comfortable writing from.
What kind of minds are you able to get [into] and imagine being?

A major reason I love to read novels is to be able to get into the body and minds of persons totally different from myself.

My own writing of course grows from my personal points of view that have changed with age and with living in totally different environments.

Kathy Robertson
[POV] should convey the author’s opinion without being obvious.
Metaphors are effective tools in conveying imagery.
The true meaning should be elusive, not fully comprehended until the end.
One image building on the other until the complete meaning is fully realized.

Becky Alexander
I like to use the antiquated POV known as the “omniscient storyteller,” the guy who knows all, sees all and this includes knowing (and telling) what the characters even think, let alone what they do, see, etc. Think of the writers of the Bible.

I like this form as it is time tested, has survived for centuries and is the easiest form (for me) in which to write.

Case in point: I hate second person POV. [Sounds like a lecture].

Wendy Visser
Narrative style a) where narrator stands outside the story b) where narrator is part of the poem or story

Humour – writer writes from humourous perspective
• form of entertainment
o should not be forced but natural.

3rd person perspective – work written in 3rd person allows easy access to the reader. Can identify more with the situation – empathy.

First person -[works] depending on subject matter.

Marcie Schwindt
When I think about POV, first, second, third, whatever, just seems like an obvious choice based on the character’s voice and how intimate the reader needs to be with him/her to “get” who they are.

What’s more interesting, I think, is choosing which character’s viewpoint to write from. Personally, I choose the weakest character to showcase because they always seem to pull the most interesting text from me. Strong characters are boring. Weak people have to “fake it”, still have to learn how to cope. They have the greatest potential character arc because they have less to lose from taking risks.

Life is too short to waste writing on boring characters. The next time you need to decide whose story to tell, pick the less obvious choice: the character who might otherwise have been the sidekick. Give the non-speaking stock character a voice. Their story might surprise you.

Rob Quehl
1. In my opinion, if an author switches from one character’s point of view to another’s, then the style of writing should change to reflect this, so much so, that after a few chapters, the reader should be able to flip open the book at random and know whose point of view is being shown at that point.

2. I like the second-person point of view. If done well, it can pull the reader in and get them involved in the story, as it makes it sound like YOU, the reader, are the main character. A wonderful example of second-person for children is the “Choose Your Own Adventure” series of books. (See example below.) I have also read second-person for adults, and found it unique and engaging.

Your Very Own Robot (Choose Your Own Adventure #1) synopsis:

Your parents are scientists and inventors. One day, they throw some pieces of a robot into the trash. If you can figure out how to put the pieces together, you’ll have a robot of your very own! But do you know enough to control it? Are you ready for the adventures your very own robot will bring?

Lee Anne Johnston
I find first person narration comes naturally to me and seems to flow. I feel too artificial using third person, although this is just me. First person has obvious limitations, i.e. your narrator can not get into the minds and hearts of others, whereas an omniscient 3rd person narrator can easily float from and into many characters.

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Limerick Fun

by Lee Anne Johnston

FIRST KISS

There was nothing intrinsically amiss
With that rite of passage, the first kiss.
I was fourteen, and curious,
My parents found out, and were furious
And the boy, I don’t remember his name!

FREE COUPONS FOR…

There was once a young man from Dundee,
Who was as tight, as the proverbial flea,
The coupons he clipped
The cashier she flipped
As he left with three bags free.

pic by stockimages | freedigitalphotos.net

pic by stockimages | freedigitalphotos.net


Lee Anne is a prose writer and has been a member of the CWC Since 2008. Her love of writing started when she learned to read as a young child. She holds a BA and an MA in English from the University of Toronto. One of Lee Anne’s current works in progress is a Victorian piece set in the City of Cambridge. It is chock full of drama, rich language and time period references. Lee Anne currently lives in Cambridge with her husband and daughter.

Pumpkin

by Lee Anne Johnston

“I’m pregnant,” my sister announced dramatically. My husband and I had gotten together with Christine and her brood to carve the pumpkin. We have done this every year since she had began producing children, four children ago.

I felt sucker punched. Why was it so easy for her to pop out these adorable babies who turned into adorable toddlers then children, when Steve and I had tried every method under the sun to conceive. Frozen sperm, frozen eggs, IVF, ICSI, IUI, cryotherapy. Acupuncture. You name it, we had endured every indignity under the sun to pursue that elusive pregnancy. My husband had even produced a fresh sample in a Hamilton Tim Hortons’ bathroom for sperm count analysis at McMaster. And now my sister so cheerfully, gleefully, positively GLORYING in her fecundity.

stuck in a pumpkin

photo by 707d3k from Flikr.com

It just was not fair a voice inside me screamed. I wanted to grab the god-damned pumpkin and smash it into her face!

“And who is the father this time?” I asked innocently.

That is how I ended up with my face stuck inside the pumpkin.


Lee Anne is a prose writer and has been a member of the CWC Since 2008. Her love of writing started when she learned to read as a young child. She holds a BA and an MA in English from the University of Toronto. One of Lee Anne’s current works in progress is a Victorian piece set in the City of Cambridge. It is chock full of drama, rich language and time period references. Lee Anne currently lives in Cambridge with her husband and daughter.

Joy

by Lee Anne Johnston

Image by kongsky | FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Sometimes I think we writers take ourselves a little too seriously. I am a writer. I have much to say. I have much to say about the sad, inequitable state of the world. I know what I’m talking about, as I write murder mysteries.

While pondering about what to write for this blog, thinking of what might be helpful to other writers, I thought of my favourite moments in the Cambridge Writers Collective. You know what? They are the silly moments.

One writer almost never takes himself seriously, and his work is incredibly intricate and poised. Another acclaimed writer shared a short story last week that had me in stitches. I laughed like a goof. The power of words extends to pure pleasure and this is a good thing.

I’m going to continue writing my stories of death and family dysfunction, but I always keep in mind a lecture I attended by P.D. James, one of the most literate and prolific murder writers of all times. She said that murder mysteries are a modern extension of the medieval mystery plays which were produced and performed entirely by the Catholic Church. At the end of a murder mystery, the crimes have ended, the perpetrator is punished, and harmony in society is restored. Life, and writing can be hopeful and even touched by grace, whatever one perceives that grace to be. For me, it’s a giggle.


Lee Anne Johnston is a devoted member of the CWC and writes historical murder stories as well as varied flash fiction.

Princess Margaret

by Lee Anne Johnston

Photo by Simon Howden; freedigitalphotos.net


I walked slowly beside my Dad along the 14th floor corridor to the vast windows overlooking the Creating Memory garden. I caught my breath in delight at the life-sized steel sculptures running, jumping, dancing. Their bodies were stiff in joyous motion. Flowers embraced them, blooming promiscuously in a riot of pinks, purples and crimsons.

“This is wonderful Dad!”

My gravely ill father who had scared the shit out of me all my life, stumbled on his stick thin legs. I held him tenderly, afraid to bruise his translucent, papery skin.

“This place is full of cancer. Take me back to my bed, Lee Anne.”


Lee Anne Johnston is a devoted member of the CWC and writes historical murder stories as well as varied flash fiction.

Breaking Through That Dreaded BLOCK

Image: Idea go / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Since no one person has all the answers, we’ve starting gathering around-the-table tips from members on subjects that affect us all. What follows is some of what came out of our discussion on writer’s block.

Lee Anne Johnston:
I journal every day. In my formal writing, I write in the first person so the characters seem to develop themselves and tell their own story. I also am a very slow writer. I write historical mysteries and I just love learning the gritty details about the past that will make my story come to life.

Barb Day:
There you are writing away, the words flowing from you, gushing out, you can’t get your thoughts down on paper fast enough. Your mind is working faster than your pen. And then it happens – you hit a brick wall, your mind closes (more like slams shut.) Your pen comes to a screeching halt. For me- it’s always two reasons – I’m tired of sitting in the same spot for hours or I’m not knowledgeable about the topic I’m writing about. I get up, get a coffee, take a break and come back refreshed and ready to do research. The joys of Google and from the research, ideas pop into my head like crazy just from reading what someone else has written even though it’s dry, boring facts. And then I’m back at it – full speed ahead, refreshed and armed with new knowledge.

Barbara Lefcourt:
The key for me when I want very much to write but cannot get thoughts to flow IS TO NOT SIT AT MY DESK. Rather, I turn my attention to some of the mindless household chores that always get delayed being done: dusting, vacuuming, cleaning floors, hand laundry, etc. etc. etc. It also sometimes help to put favourite instrumental music ( no vocals) on my stereo. That often sets the stage for the magical flow of poetic expression. And it’s good to have paper and pencil handy around the house so I can easily pause to jot down ideas, expressions, particular words that must be captured before they fly from my head.

Marcie Schwindt:

  • I try to write something everyday to keep the muse happy and coming back.
  • I read from something published every day. There’s always something to be learned from someone else’s successes.
  • I critique at least one unpublished work every week. Figuring out on my own what does and doesn’t work for me, and why, is more helpful to me than anything I’ve learned second-hand (through a course, instructional book, etc.).
  • I plot out my stories, then don’t write them sequentially. If I’m blocked on something, I write around it. Once I have the thing surrounded, it usually surrenders.
  • I stop writing mid-sentence or mid-scene. That way I don’t really have to face a blank page the next day. I already know how that sentence or scene should end.

Diane Attwell Palfrey:

  • I get a lot of inspiration from news stories or articles I read via different search engines. I like to research a topic and then write about it. So when the idea train has left the tracks – I head for the PC. I like to write about people and relationships, the human condition etc. News is full of items that can be turned into poetry.
  • I also get ideas from Facebook. I’ll read my homepage and that will inspire me. Sometimes I can’t quite believe the kind of things that people blog on a public forum. But then I think – well – it’s giving me a subject to write about.
  • Sometimes I ply myself with chocolate and listen to music. It soothes and helps the ideas flow.
  • Most of my writing is done after midnight. That’s when the house is quiet, the phone has stopped ringing and there are no more e-mails to deal with.
  • I’m not above asking others for ideas. I’ll often ask someone to give me an idea. I’ll just say, “hey, I need to write a poem – do you have an idea for me – tell me a story and I’ll turn it into a poem for you”. My mother is a great source for that.

Have you ever suffered from Writer’s Block? How did you overcome it?

Writing authentically; embracing my voice

by Lee Anne Johnston

Image: imagerymajestic / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

I have a fairly strong personality and I am a craven people pleaser. To my dismay, sometimes people react very strongly against me – I seem to be able to irritate some folks easily and often unwittingly.

So when it comes to writing, I am happy to write authentically. I’ve kept a diary since I was a young girl, and sometimes in my more polished writing, my personal self pokes through, rough edges and all. It’s the sharing of my work that I find incredibly daunting. When I read a personal piece, I feel like I have no skin. But what is the point of writing if it is to be kept under lock and key?

I have not entirely resolved this conflict. I want to write honestly, and at times my feelings and experiences cannot be held back. I am not even certain that they should be denied as surely the writer herself is part of the product? The purpose of good writing is to forge an emotional connection with the reader. Yet at the same time I am not comfortable in vulnerability. One solution I have embraced is to embed some of my own personality, history and challenges into the heart of a character. If Sally James, a suspect in my murder mystery set in 1900 has an emotional outburst, perhaps the intimacy of her experience will not be traced to the writer? Just sayin’….


Lee Anne is a prose writer and has been a member of the CWC for two years. Her love of writing started when she learned to read as a young child. She holds a BA and an MA in English from the University of Toronto. One of Lee Anne’s current works in progress is a Victorian piece set in the City of Cambridge. It is chock full of drama, rich language and time period references. Lee Anne currently lives in Cambridge with her husband and daughter.